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At a hearing for the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, RCMP Assistant Commissioner Joanne Crampton suggests the current statistics on human trafficking fall short of capturing the scope of the issue and that human trafficking is strongly linked to high rates of violence against Indigenous women and girls. Read more in the Globe and Mail article here

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For more Topics related to human trafficking and information about a new online training about human trafficking for mental health and addictions service providers, follow the new EENet Connect Humun Trafficking Forum

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It may be helpful to track 'cross border' incidents of Human Trafficking, as I had occasion to encounter some young women from Halifax, N.S. being 'trafficked' [and being 'given' Heroin], in Manchester, New Hampshire USA, before 9/11/2001-when border crossing in the USA became more closely monitored...

Our US National Center Against Domestic and Sexual Violence has 'networked' with some 'Human Trafficking' advocacy groups, including Native/Indigenous Women's groups.

At this time there is inconsistent reporting of overdose incidents in the health care system for various partners and data on drug-related deaths is slow to be released. Early release of information allows identification of merging trends. We are working on a initiative in our communities to teach our community if they see something to speak out and tell someone they trust - police, teacher, priest, neighbour or a friend... this may prevent that person from doing something that might lead to a life of drugs or a crime.

Patricia Cliche posted:

At this time there is inconsistent reporting of overdose incidents in the health care system for various partners and data on drug-related deaths is slow to be released. Early release of information allows identification of merging trends. We are working on a initiative in our communities to teach our community if they see something to speak out and tell someone they trust - police, teacher, priest, neighbour or a friend... this may prevent that person from doing something that might lead to a life of drugs or a crime.

@Registered Member did you post this reply in the place where you intended? 

Some exciting news! Talk4Healing, a helpline for Indigenous women in Northern Ontario, recently announced they received funding from the provincial government to expand their services to the rest of Ontario. Additionally, Talk4Healing is now available in 13 Indigenous languages, along with English and French.

Women are able to reach out and speak/text directly to a support worker. 

(CBC, 2018) Article located here

Michelle Kim posted:

Some exciting news! Talk4Healing, a helpline for Indigenous women in Northern Ontario, recently announced they received funding from the provincial government to expand their services to the rest of Ontario. Additionally, Talk4Healing is now available in 13 Indigenous languages, along with English and French.

Women are able to reach out and speak/text directly to a support worker. 

(CBC, 2018) Article located here

Expert tip: You may wish to post about this in a new topic so more people see it! When a new reply is written to a topic, only the member who posted the original topic, those who replied, and those who followed the topic  will be notified about it, whereas a new topic will trigger a notification to all EENet Connect members who use the site's default notification settings (of course, everyone has the ability to customize their own notification settings here). 

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