Skip to main content

Last week an Indigenous artist, mother and grandmother shared her story of human trafficking with the Sexual Assault Response Team of Waterloo Region in Kitchener, during an event supporting survivors of human trafficking. Her story is a reminder of the reality and impacts of human trafficking on women and girls, and particularly on Indigenous women and girls.

Indigenous women and girls are over-represented among people who are trafficking in Canada and are at an increased risk due to inter-generational cycles of abuse and exploitation. In addition to histories of trauma, common experiences of systemic racism can prevent Indigenous peoples from seeking help from services. Many people who come into contact with healthcare and social service providers may not get the help they need.

Attached you will find a list of Indigenous-specific health and social service providers who can support Indigenous clients who are being or who have been trafficked. This list is from EENet’s new introductory online course on Human Trafficking. For more information on Indigenous-specific considerations when working with First Nations, Inuit or Métis peoples who may have been trafficked, see Module 4 of the course.

For more Topics related to human trafficking for mental health and addictions service providers, follow the new EENet Connect Human Trafficking Forum

Attachments

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

That was an incredibly difficult story to digest. It was even harder to bear when she writes "the system had failed her [sic] mother" from being abused. It's very evident how all of these elements are interrelated - sexual assault, to homelessness, to drug/substance use, to petty crimes, to mental health issues. 

Thx for sharing! I will be registering for the course. 

Last edited by Registered Member
Michelle Kim posted:

That was an incredibly difficult story to digest. It was even harder to bear when she writes "the system had failed her [sic] mother" from being abused. It's very evident how all of these elements are interrelated - sexual assault, to homelessness, to drug/substance use, to petty crimes, to mental health issues. 

Thx for sharing! I will be registering for the course. 

I agree Michelle, it was a tough article to read and so courageous of her to share her story publicly so that we may understand the complexities and ways in which survivors navigate a system that perhaps does not help or provide the best support.

Add Reply

CAMH Logo

This website has been funded by a grant from the Government of Ontario.
The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Ontario.
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×