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Gambling, Gaming & Technology Use Community of Interest

The Gambling, Gaming & Technology Use Community of Interest brings together addiction and mental health service providers, researchers and subject matter experts in the fields of gambling, technology/Internet use and video gaming to collaborate and share knowledge on emerging trends and clinical best practices.

Tagged With "Parenting"

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Blog: Parenting Through Video Game Disorder

Registered Member ·
A newly released blog on Learn.ProblemGambling.ca highlights some of the challenges of parenting a child with problem video gaming. The blog was contributed by Elaine Uskoski, a holistic health social service worker and author of the book Seeing Through the Cracks . She discusses the experience of finding out her 19-year old son has a video game disorder and how they worked together to get him to where he is today. Read her blog here .
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Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
A recent research article published in the journal Pediatric Research looks at the effects of "technoference" (defined as digital/mobile technology use that interrupts interpersonal relationships) in a parent-child relationship. Here are some interesting findings from the study that looked at technoference in 183 couples & their children over a 6-month period: 55.5% of mothers and 43.0% of fathers reported having two or more technology devices that interrupt activities with their child...
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Parents should worry less about screen time, says UK doctors

Registered Member ·
I was in England over the Christmas break and the topic of screen time for children came up, which caught my attention for both personal and work reasons. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health says parents should take a balanced approach to screen time and that it cannot be prescriptive. This is different from Canadian guidance which recommends no screen time for children under 2 and only one hour a day for children 2-4 years old. You can read the full article here.
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
Such interesting findings! I wonder if the length of time that parents spend with their children make a difference to the level of technoference experienced, and in turn the behavioral outcomes - as stay at home moms of little ones under 5 spend a lot more time with their kids, and likely experience this to a greater degree than parents who work. I also wonder if there are any mediating factors that might reduce the behavioral problems seen in young children as a result of technoference?
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
Thanks for sharing the informative video, Elaine, and thanks Rebecca for your insightful questions. I think the current research article is scratching the surface and that more research and clinical evidence is needed on technoference and the long-term consequences on the parent-child relationship, the parent and the youth. As the article and Sarah pointed out (thank you!), it is likely a bi-directional relationship with many complex factors to consider. But this article does provide a great...
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
This is such an interesting thread. It's also brought to my mind the amount that technology is used in the classroom now. Even my son in JK had specific iPad time and tasks that he had to complete/lerning activities to complete. I would wonder if that will eventually factor in to the research as well.
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Re: Parents should worry less about screen time, says UK doctors

Registered Member ·
Interestingly, the majority of their sample was related to watching TV, not playing games / cellphones / computers. I think this is a serious limitation of this research, as there are many significant differences in terms of interactivity, reward expectation, and level of stimulation between watching TV and playing online games, for example. As a psychiatrist, I will point out this limitation to my clients and continue to follow Canadian guidelines.
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
Thanks Tiffany - I think the bi-directional nature of the relationship between parent technology use and child behavioural problems is an important consideration. Parents with children with behavioural problems would likely benefit from understanding, support and opportunities to learn positive coping skills for their own high stress levels.
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
Hi Tiffany, this is fascinating. Thank for posting! Can you elaborate briefly on what they meant by devices "that interrupt activities with their child on a daily basis." How can a device 'interrupt' an activity, particularly an interpersonal activity? Even a quick example would be great. Thanks!
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
Thanks for your question, Sylvia. According to the authors, the term technoference was coined by McDaniel and Coyne (2016) and refers to interruptions in interpersonal interactions or time spent together due to technology. This can include sending texts or emails, checking your phone or social media, and even picking up a phone call or answering a text during a conversation with your child (although this is not limited just to the parent-child relationship but to other relationships in your...
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Re: Research on Parent-Child "Technoference"

Registered Member ·
This is such important information for parents to understand in terms of interpersonal development with their young children. Although much of my Video Gaming Disorder Talk covers gaming teens and young adults, its important for parents to realize how their own behaviour with texting, emails and social media may be a contributing factor in the outbursts and tantrums they are seeing when removing gaming devices or reducing the hours their child spends gaming. Here's a good video clip with...
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New gaming / gambling resource for parents & caregivers

Registered Member ·
The Young Gamers and Gamblers Education Trust (YGAM) just launched a new online resource - the Parent Hub - that provides parents/caregivers with information and guidance to help support young people to engage with and enjoy the world of video games while being safe online. Although designed for parents/caregivers, this is also a great resource for teachers, youth workers, mental health clinicians, and anyone who works with young people and their families. (Note: YGAM is a UK-based...
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Re: New gaming / gambling resource for parents & caregivers

Registered Member ·
This looks like a great resource for family members - and at every range of the continuum of use. Both visually appealing and informative!
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